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Version 2.0

A winning, small-matrix rendition of this super-elliptical monoline sans. If you’d like, please enjoy a private clone to tour the brand-spankin’ new interiors.

I embraced innovation at the expense of imperfection with faux-curve composite stacks. These custom bricks are used to resolve the most glaring proportion issues besetting version 1 (and 2’s) capitals. I risk intermittent aliasing as well as potential inconsistencies in both curvature and stroke contrast. Yet these composite-stack discontinuities (A,C,D,G,J,O,Q,S,U,V) marry unexpectedly well with the extensively used macaroni bricks and remain themselves smooth up to an impressive 72pt.

Manual kerning leaves a lot of room for improvement. The alternates are included mostly for curiosity’s sake. Another work in progress with samples to follow. Feedback is always very appreciated; thanks in advance for it! :)

Info: Created on 5th August 2011 . Last edited on 3rd September 2011.
License Creative Commons
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23 Comments

Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 20th August 2011
Just a quick demonstration of legibility with only Adobe optical kerning and a little bit of tracking. No manual adjustments! Pardon the rehashed sample, a proper one will follow. ¡^-^
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 20th August 2011
It looks fantastic, and technically brilliant. I'm really impressed with the small size working so well. I'm into that "y". Very cool. If only you could get to grips with Fontlab & illustrator..... you'd be unstoppable. :-)
Comment by djnippa 21st August 2011
Trendy new face fontstructed on a small grid. Fine details built by sophisticated combinations of custom bricks. The sample text looks beautifully balanced, flawless. You are the master of composites. 10/10
Comment by Frodo7 21st August 2011
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 21st August 2011
@djnippa: Thank you for your kind support and all the encouragement. These alluringly curvaceous small-matrix text fontstructions prove to me a conviction I have held strongly since my initial days of using Rob’s software.

It was this type battle, that turned me on to the whole phenomenon, after all. I had plenty of brilliant inspiration from true pros and passionate aficionados there to spark my interest.

It became quickly and somewhat disappointingly clear that a custom brick function is necessary to achieve the results I envisioned. This drove me in my original search for a way to stack bricks. Idly wishing I could combine brick shapes, messing with transparent overlays involving sets of dragged bricks, this led to my first unintentionally undo-glitched stack.

How did that happen, right? But I had already worked out the solutions they offered to design problems I encountered initially working at such small scales. Boy, did I clamor for customizable bricks in the early days! ;)

So here’s the proof. It turns out patience is the stronger virtue. Rob always seems to balance ease-of-use and accessibility with rapid integration of complex features. Yet, we now have been given by him a custom brick tool perhaps deceptive in its simplicity. The real potential of stackable composites is quite impressive and offers more than a few twists and turns.

The ‘y’ was a particular trick at this small scale. I feel proud of the unconventional outcome, and pleased you dig it. Born of a combination of approaches used to form ‘a’ and ‘v’, it still shocked me by working out. As usual, screen legibility pushed me in my attempts at improvement.

@Frodo7: Thank you always for your pithy and generously observed comments. Your compliments are a pleasure! :)
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 22nd August 2011
The new curvilicious C G O Q U are beautiful. Pardon me for not recognizing other interspersed brilliance that I am incapable of appreciating.
Comment by minimum 22nd August 2011
The proof is in the reading. This works so well as a text face. 10/10
Comment by p2pnut 22nd August 2011
Fifteen out of ten. The evolution sampler is instructive. Simply one of the best ever fstructions.
Comment by intaglio 22nd August 2011
@will.i.ૐ: how did you make those thin elements (blocks)?
Comment by regular_one 22nd August 2011
Congratulations! FontStruct Staff have deemed your FontStruction worthy of special mention. “fs Rondeux” is now a Top Pick.
Comment by Rob Meek (meek) 23rd August 2011
Man, I don't even know where to start with this one. Its left me speechless for a while. Every glyph is like looking at a magic trick. I mean, the ink trap on the d? Really? Bless you for having the tenacity and sagacity of pulling this one off. I would have never attempted it. Amazing accomplishment. I have to look hard for things that I would improve or do differently, but I only find nitpicky things like inconsistent use of micro-serifs, and miniscule differences between M and N horizontals.

Your process does raise a lot of questions for me. When I start at text font I'm usually working with bricks I design first or with a fontstruction similar to DJNippa's brick template. This fontstruction contains over 300 bricks - a majority of them custom made. How are you possibly keeping track of what bricks you are using? My approach for text is completely opposite, working in a large scale with minimal brick usage conforming for speed instead of individuality, so this work fascinates and intrigues simultaneously.

But here's what I mean: Paradoxx is 90 grid spaces high and uses only 26 bricks.
Comment by geneus1 27th August 2011
excellent work!
Comment by zulard 27th August 2011
This is amazing.

It's visually beautiful, but you really need to clone it and look at how it's built.
Comment by aphoria 27th August 2011
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 28th August 2011
Before launching into a proper detailed response to my friends here, I want to extend a hearty thank you to all who have commented. Truly, thank you for your interest, excitement, and encouragement! I receive your feedback as an affirmation of great value.

Please give me a few days, no more than a week, to collect my thoughts and finish moving into my new home. Once this transition is accomplished, I promise to give a substantial reply to better illuminate my thought/design process.
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 29th August 2011
What? It will take me days to shot my mouth again. Such a brilliant use of the app...
Comment by kix 29th August 2011
Wow great work !!! very strong
It's worth to take time to look at every single glyph.
Comment by Michel Troy ~UrbanPixel~ (Upixel) 3rd September 2011
I agree with kix. My keyboard is about to short-circuit, I'm drooling on it so much. Oh--there my keyboard goessssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
Comment by Logan Thomason (xenophilius) 19th October 2011
Wow. Just… wow. This may be my all-time favorite FontStruction.
Gotta pick my jaw up off of the floor now!
Comment by mattesque 27th November 2011
Very nice font.

will you make the predecessors(Rondo&Rondeau) of Rondeux available also? Your evolution map displays them nicely.
Comment by rj10328 17th April 2012
Comment by demonics 2nd August 2012
Amplitude?
Comment by demonics 2nd August 2012

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